Welcome to the McMurray Library


  • FALL 2020: LOOK HERE FOR A RANGE OF USEFUL RESOURCES FOR YOU TO ACCESS DURING REMOTE LEARNING  

    Banned Books Week is September 28-October 3 

    Censorship is a Dead End. Find Your Freedom to Read.  

    Watch this brief video: Top Ten Most Challenged Books of 2019

    Take a look at this list: Top 100 Most Banned and Challenged Books: 2010-2019

    Take a stand: Dear Banned Author Letter-Writing Campaign

     What is Banned Books Week?

    "Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read. Highlighting the value of free and open access to information, Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community –- librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types –- in shared support of the freedom to seek, to publish, to read, and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

    By focusing on efforts across the country to remove or restrict access to books, Banned Books Week draws national attention to the harms of censorship. The books featured during Banned Books Week have all been targeted for removal or restrictions in libraries and schools. While books have been and continue to be banned, part of the Banned Books Week celebration is the fact that, in a majority of cases, the books have remained available. This happens only thanks to the efforts of librarians, teachers, students, and community members who stand up and speak out for the freedom to read.

    This year’s Banned Books Week theme is “Censorship is a Dead End. Find Your Freedom to Read.” Censorship limits exploration and creates barriers to access information. The path toward the freedom to read starts at the library."

                                                                                                              --from the American Library Association

     

     Library and Book Information 

    Library Book Checkout Fall 2020: We are in the process of developing a plan for circulating books from the McMurray Library and will let you know as soon as we are ready to launch. Stay tuned!

    • Library Book Returns from last year: We are continuing the process of gathering the library books students borrowed from our school libraries during the 2019-2020 school year (and earlier). In order to distinguish our school library books from public library books, look for a barcode on the book that includes the name of the school and/or a school name stamped on the inside of the book or on the outer edges of the book. Books can be returned at the Vashon High School HUB, the district-wide drop off/pick up location for school materials. The HUB hours are Monday-Thursday 8:30-9:15, 11:00-1:00, and 2:00-4:00. Please feel free to contact the school librarians if you have any questions: klawrence@vashonsd.org (CES), jjaffe@vashonsd.org (MCM), cfoster@vashonsd.org (VHS). 

    • KCLS Student Account video tutorial from Ms. Jaffe explaining how to access and use this account.  Watch this brief additional video tutorial that completes the explanation.

    • KCLS Student Account video tutorial from King County Library System explaining how to access and use this account

    • Little Free Libraries are located in front of McMurray and Vashon High School. Books are free and for all ages K-12, with some adult books as well. Book donations are accepted and can be placed in the bin in front of McMurray.

    • Genre Book Lists for 7th Grade Humanites (or anyone!)

    informational books

    biography, autobiography, memoir

    historical fiction

    mystery

    science fiction

    poetry: realistic fiction and historical fiction written in verse (poetic form)

    poetry: nonfiction books written in verse (poetic form

    Check Out These Brief Videos About Books and Authors

    • Be sure to look through the entire list! (videos added weekly)

    Additional Cool Resources

    • Jason Reynolds: "Write. Right. Rite" Series

    • A Live Reading of Neil Gaiman's Coraline, hosted by NY Public Library (scroll to bottom of page to see all chapters)

    • Library of Congress Resources for Family Engagement

    Sheltered in Place: COVID-19 Zine Diaries Project, sponsored by Washington Center for the Book

     • KNKX Take the Mic: We are living through an extraordinary time and what will help all of us get through it is sharing our stories. And that includes YOUR story! KNKX would like to get more voices of kids and teens on the air.

    • WORLD Channel/PBS Learning Home Learning 

    • KCLS K-12 Educator, Parent, and Caregiver Support

    McMurray Library

     Thank You, PIE, for Your Generous Support of Our School Libraries

    One powerful trait that steers us toward life-long learning is curiosity, and a resource-rich library plays a central role in cultivating this trait. The number of distinctive science-related books currently being published for young adults is impressive. Middle school students gravitate toward these informative and inspiring books, and many students who prefer nonfiction are especially drawn toward them. Every day, McMurray students deepen on discover an interest while exploring the books on our shelves. We are grateful for PIE's ongoing support.

     

     PIE
     
    Resources
    Hours
    The library is open 30 minutes before school (7:30) and 30 minutes after school (3:15). It also is open during one lunch period each day. It is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday for 7th and 8th graders, and it is open Tuesday and Thursday for 6th graders. 
     
    Loan Period 
    Students may have up to 10 items checked out at any one time; the loan period is three weeks. Students may renew materials they need for longer than three weeks; they just need to bring the book or magazine to the library in order to renew it. This policy helps students keep track of the materials they borrow. A student may check out library materials as long as he or she doesn’t have any overdue (or lost) items. If the student has an overdue item, it’s a simple matter of returning it or bringing it to the library to renew it in order to check out additional items. There are no fines for overdue books; however, students are responsible for lost or damaged materials.